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20121216
20121216
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the u.s. government it would make us look like greece tomorrow. instead, they are in like netherland so stuff like this happens. >> we're beginning to look like greece right now. but some things have improved. prices have gone up but that is supply and demand issue. supply is way down so delinquency rights are still very high. >> this is biggest government stimulus program of all. people forget, this stimulus, five trillion bucks. the president is rallying about fat cat bay but they were exempt from dodd-frank. they basically dominate the mark 90% of the mortgage market. they've got government backing. they don't have to compete. they don't have to out perform. they make more money than the government overseer, that is doing their job. you have directors there making millions of dollars. we should have reined them in long time ago. >> there was a ignite named franklin rains, he made $90 million back during his reign and they gave out $45 million in bonuses. these organizations have a bad history. >> they got a bad history. we have always known that. they were never real based on market
of the u.s. government it uld make us look like greece tomorrow. instead, they are in like netherland so stuff like this happens. >> we're beginning to look like greece right now. butome things have improved. prices have gone up but that is supply and demand issue. supply is way down so delinquency rights are still very high. >> this is biggest government stimulus program of all. people forget, this stimulus, five trillion bucks. the president is rallying about fat cat bay but they were exempt from dodd-frank. they basically dominate the mark 90% of the mortgage market. they've got government backing. they don't have to compete. they don't have to out perform. they make more money than the government overseer, that is doing their job. you have directors there making millions of dollars. we should have reined them in long time ago. >> there was a ignite named franklin rains, he made $90 million back during his reign and they gave out $45 million in bonuses. these organizations have a bad history. >> they got a bad history. we have always known that. they were never real based on market fo
greece or italy? twenty years? i don't know. this trendline is bad. happening under bush and obama. it does not work. john: good intentions and that go bad. clean energy's. >> solyndra. the tip of the a's spurred. dozens of companies go bad. the story behind the story. campaign contributors contributors, interest free loans from the government, distorting capital, it means resources are being used less productively and workers get lower wages and it adds up to the bad situation. john: president bush says it to oklahoma you take care of things it is good for the economy. >> collor you create a housing bubble. those people were the ones that had to walk out onto the plank then we all fall into the shark infested waters 87 tax credits. >> sounds great. but from the tax code in 1913 only 14 pages we have warped into the 702000 page monster. more than 1,000 different forms to download. nobody understands. h&r block loves it but it is a news around the neck of the american economy. every page has something in it that sounds good but look what it adds up to 27 spending. the welfare state.
agree come you both, do you agree with angela merkel's insistence on austerity for greece, spain and italy? >> austerity, yes. the definition of how much. but there's no way you can deal with that problem without a substantial degree of austerity in cases where they have excesses and bubbles and various parts of the economy and deficiencies. you can't sustainably bail them out without basically quid pro quo. on the other hand, let me say you can expect them to maintain austerity and less they're going to get -- that there will be some action. or within a definite period. and this is where kind of the rubber meets the road. everybody i think understands that, let's not call austerity, but you need very discipline policy by the borrower. unity willingness to lend on a part of the creditors. accreditors don't quite trust the borrower's. the borrowers don't quite trust the creditors that they will provide the money. so they don't do this on a grand scale. they do it, comes to kind of a, they differ too much. say, we'll go in for another three months. then a few months later they come
's greece. we continue e them, you know, gone past the proverbial, you know, they have gone over, and it feels weir base there's people re-election -- weird because there's a lot of people who are relatively poor, and if you're rich, you can handle it, but they both are together on the same things, and it's those people in the middle, those 1 million, by the way, who leftn the last ten years to go to texas because they are the ones who get crush in all of this, and real opportunities are a loss for everyone, and at some point, you hit a break wall. it's happening around the world right now. neil: how many wil actually use it for the intentions it has? >> from what i read, they admit programs like this around the country have been ripe with all kinds of frauds. i would suspect a vast majority sell it. i can't imagine, you know, a lot of homeless people are drug addicts, you know, we got -- by the way, we got a lot of programs out there. you know, for homeless people, and we got a ton of progra. i know people who have n worked in 30 years. th are alive. they have been through a zil
. the way that we look back and preserve the, you know, some of the ruins in rome and greece. i don't think we want to lose that. you know, as far as what it becomes, i have no idea. sorry. [laughter] >> yeah, back there. >> [inaudible] >> former neighbor. >> exactly. great neighbor, by the way, also. [laughter] my question is, you know, i love detroit, moved to new york also, moved back, and just tremendously in love with the city still. i've been back now for six years, and just, i mean, every day there's shotgun new about the city that i just fall -- something new about the city that i just fall in love with. i live outside the city, but the question is what neighborhood or area did you find most fascinating? just really just wowed, this is the cool or the bomb shell, you know, that you just could not, you know leave out of, and you just had to go there, like, the next day. >> i'll mention two. first, our street. this was another weird moment. i was looking for a sort of semifurnished apartment, found it on craig's list, and there was a single block, you know, a service street, yeah, not
is 2. and he wrote that the great empires, asyria, persian, greece, the roman, the arab empires, the ottoman empires, spain, russia, britain, each flourished for around 250 years, and this seems to be the space allotted for imperial he generalny. too long a period of power leads to decadence, so the empire goes from the pioneers to the innovators, to the bureaucrats, from exploration on exploitation to decadence, the quest for world approval, the welfare state and squabbles over inherited wealth. and a notable feature, he writes, of the declining nations is the loss of physical energy. he suggests, as does the bible, that the state of a human organism is no different than the family. both recapitulate human individual tendencies, and like the individual human, evolve in predictable directions. the human might, indeed can, live to be 120 years, but no longer, and will decay through predict blg stages as will the family, however well ty -- and the state, however powerful. and now we see we in america are at the outword end of sir john gloves' 250 years, and we see the signs. we ha
fiscal accounts in balance and move them in the right direction so that we don't become greece? it is interesting that we talk about the -- the previous panel talked about state government and one big problem in europe is there is no fiscal coordination among the independent countries analogous somewhat to our states and who has to bail them out when they haven't done what they are supposed to do? i don't know that we are all that much different. so, we have a great panel. people that are far smarter than i am. i'm going to introduce them now and i will introduce them all and i will sit down and i get to ask some questions. i will ask the panel to keep i will ask the panel to keep their answers
the economic instability that we have in europe, as to what is happening in greece and we have our fiscal cliff here in the united states, what role do you see the council on foreign relations play in the overall big picture, especially helping to ease the situation of the economic problems in the united states? guest: the council on foreign relations is an independent, non-partisan organization that has nothing to do with the u.s. government other than the fact that our scholars try to help influence and educate the public. the government on foreign policy. the uprising in the arab world, to the caller's question, is happening in the worst of all possible times. the u.s. and strapped financially. europe is back in a recession and confronted with serious economic problems, but europe and the united states would, in the past, be the place that traditionally had helped to support economic change and prosperity in that part of the world. now what we're seeing are caught are countries like -- are countries like qatar in saudi arabia stepping in. again, the instability in the region is timed in perh
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)

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